Together, we can unite against hate

the largest white nationalist rallies in recent years, many of our students are scared, anxious and confused. As parents and educators processing our own shock and disbelief, we may struggle to find the right words to offer.

But now, more than ever, we cannot shy away from talking about this terrible topic with our students. As NEA President Lily Eskelsen García writes in her post  “The People We Are Supposed to Be” this week:

“There is, perhaps, nothing harder than a conversation on race. But do it, because how we feel about race and how we react to racism informs how we feel about and react to all other forms of bias and prejudice.”
Below are links to resources for students, educators, and families to conduct meaningful conversations around race, foster healing in the wake of Charlottesville, and make sure your students feel welcome, supported, and valued. 
Together, we can foster safe spaces to move towards justice in education. Together, we can unite against hate.

 

NEA Speaks Out
This is a comprehensive collection of resources for students, educators, and families to address and engage in the national dialogue about racism, hate, and bias in the wake of recent events in Charlottesville. Topics and resources include:
  • How to deal with acts of racism and hate – before, during and after a crisis
  • White supremacy
  • Talking about race in the classroom – creating safe spaces and starting the conversation
  • Helping children cope with a traumatic event
  • Teaching tolerance and safety
Before we start any dialogue, it’s important to check in with ourselves and understand what experiences (both positive and negative) we are bringing to the discussion.
Useful advice on finding common ground in values statements, and keeping the conversation focused on results we all want to achieve rather than just assigning blame for present inequities.
10 Actions To Stop White Supremacy and Stand Up For Civil Rights – from our partners at the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights.
“There is, perhaps, nothing harder than a conversation on race. But do it, because how we feel about race and how we react to racism informs how we feel about and react to all.”
Responding to Hate and Bias in Schools
This is a comprehensive collection of resources for students, educators, and families to address and engage in the national dialogue about racism, hate, and bias in the wake of recent events in Charlottesville. Topics and resources include:
  • How to deal with acts of racism and hate – before, during and after a crisis
  • White supremacy
  • Talking about race in the classroom – creating safe spaces and starting the conversation
  • Helping children cope with a traumatic event
  • Teaching tolerance and safety
Before we start any dialogue, it’s important to check in with ourselves and understand what experiences (both positive and negative) we are bringing to the discussion.
Useful advice on finding common ground in values statements, and keeping the conversation focused on results we all want to achieve rather than just assigning blame for present inequities.
10 Actions To Stop White Supremacy and Stand Up For Civil Rights – from our partners at the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights.

Please stay up to date on the latest news and engagement at www.NEAEdJustice.org.

In solidarity,
The NEAEdJustice Team

Author: Nancy Sasso Janis

Nancy Sasso Janis currently is a first grade teacher at Andrew Avenue Elementary School. She has been teaching first grade and kindergarten in the district for thirty years.